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Why use Hadoop ?

One typical drive from 1990 could store 1,370 MB of data and had a transfer speed of 4.4 MB/s, so you could read all the data from a full drive in around five minutes. Over 20 years later, one terabyte drives are the norm, but the transfer speed is around 100 MB/s, so it takes more than two and a half hours to read all the data off the disk.

This is a long time to read all data on a single drive and writing is even slower. The obvious way to reduce the time is to read from multiple disks at once. Imagine if we had 100 drives, each holding one hundredth of the data. Working in parallel, we could read the data in under two minutes.

The approach taken by MapReduce may seem like a brute-force approach. The premise is that the entire dataset or at least a good portion of it is processed for each query. But this is its power. MapReduce is a batch query processor, and the ability to run an ad hoc query against your whole dataset and get the results in a reasonable time is transformative. It changes the way you think about data, and unlocks data that was previously archived on tape or disk. It gives people the opportunity to innovate with data. Questions that took too long to get answered before can now be answered, which in turn leads to new questions and new insights.

For updating the majority of a database, a B-Tree is less efficient than MapReduce, which uses Sort/Merge to rebuild the database.

An RDBMS is good for point queries or updates, where the dataset has been indexed to deliver low-latency retrieval and update times of a relatively small amount of data. MapReduce suits applications where the data is written once, and read many times, whereas a relational database is good for datasets that are continually updated.

MapReduce works well on unstructured or semistructured data, since it is designed to interpret the data at processing time. In other words, the input keys and values for MapReduce are not an intrinsic property of the data, but they are chosen by the person analyzing the data.

A web server log is a good example of a set of records that is not normalized (for example, the client hostnames are specified in full each time, even though the same client may appear many times), and this is one reason that logfiles of all kinds are particularly well-suited to analysis with MapReduce.

MapReduce is a linearly scalable programming model. The programmer writes two functions a map function and a reduce function each of which defines a mapping from one set of key-value pairs to another. These functions are oblivious to the size of the data or the cluster that they are operating on, so they can be used unchanged for a small dataset and for a massive one. More important, if you double the size of the input data, a job will run twice as slow. But if you also double the size of the cluster, a job will run as fast as the original one. This is not generally true of SQL queries.

In April 2008, Hadoop broke a world record to become the fastest system to sort a terabyte of data. Running on a 910-node cluster, Hadoop sorted one terabyte in 209 seconds (just under 3½ minutes), beating the previous year’s winner of 297 seconds . In November of the same year, Google reported that its MapReduce implementation sorted one terabyte in 68 seconds. As the first edition of this book was going to press (May 2009), it was announced that a team at Yahoo! used Hadoop to sort one terabyte in 62 seconds.

Data Flow

There are two types of nodes that control the job execution process: a jobtracker and a number of tasktrackers. The jobtracker coordinates all the jobs run on the system by scheduling tasks to run on tasktrackers. Tasktrackers run tasks and send progress reports to the jobtracker, which keeps a record of the overall progress of each job. If a task fails, the jobtracker can reschedule it on a different tasktracker. Hadoop divides the input to a MapReduce job into fixed-size pieces called input splits, or just splits. Hadoop creates one map task for each split, which runs the userdefined map function for each record in the split.

Map tasks write their output to the local disk, not to HDFS. Why is this? Map output is intermediate output: it’s processed by reduce tasks to produce the final output, and once the job is complete the map output can be thrown away. So storing it in HDFS, with replication, would be overkill. If the node running the map task fails before the map output has been consumed by the reduce task, then Hadoop will automatically rerun the map task on another node to re-create the map output.

Typical Hadoop installation has following setup –

  • Single instance of a Task Tracker is run on each Slave node. Task tracker is run as a separate JVM process.
  • Single instance of a DataNode daemon is run on each Slave node. DataNode daemon is run as a separate JVM process.
  • One or Multiple instances of Task Instance is run on each slave node. Each task instance is run as a separate JVM process. The number of Task instances can be controlled by configuration. Typically a high end machine is configured to run more task instance

Differences between HDFS and NAS

    • In HDFS Data Blocks are distributed across local drives of all machines in a cluster. Whereas in NAS data is stored on dedicated hardware.
    • HDFS is designed to work with MapReduce System, since computation are moved to data. NAS is not suitable for MapReduce since data is stored seperately from the computations.
    • HDFS runs on a cluster of machines and provides redundancy usinga replication protocal. Whereas NAS is provided by a single machine therefore does not provide data redundancy.

Should read map Reduce introduction posted here : http://developer.yahoo.com/hadoop/tutorial/module4.html#dataflow

MapReduce main concept :

Map – means do some stuff with raw data and send output equals Key  = Value

Reduce – means collecting all data for same key and produce final output

MapReduce work together to do processing in parallel. Awesome concept..

 

 

 

 

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